Hatching: Spoiler-Free & Full-Spoiler Discussion

Anthony, Ray and Shawn just watched Hanna Bergholm & Ilja Rautsi’s new film Hatching in an AMC theatre at the local mall. THAT’S F’ING CRAZY!!! Let us tell you why. We start with a spoiler-free reaction/review, and clearly delineate when we’re going to go full-spoiler, so join us up top to see if this new Body Horror film is for you, then after you see it, come back for our thoughts. There’s a lot to ‘chew’ on here.

Cineray’s Freaky Sex Party!

Let’s get physical, fiends! And I’m not talking about aerobics. Nope, what I am talking about is sex! And not just sex, but freaky sex at that! 

You may ask what this has to do with horror movies. Well, when the intercourse involves a human and a non-human creature, it becomes incredibly horrific. So let’s get it started with today’s double feature of The Special and The Untamed

Continue reading “Cineray’s Freaky Sex Party!”

Cineray Loves Weirdos!

It’s Cineray time, fiends! All right, if you are like me, the last year has been challenging. And if you are a lot like me, you have been watching a lot of horror movies to escape the stress of this year. Certainly, there have been times this year that have felt like life itself is the most fearsome thing in our lives. And that concept that life can sometimes be the monster that stalks us is the concept at the heart of today’s double feature of Fingers and Are We Not Cats

Continue reading “Cineray Loves Weirdos!”

Cineray Celebrates Cronenberg!

For today’s Cineray recommendations, the focus is on the early career of David Cronenberg with the films Shivers, Rabid, and The Brood. These films are very early in his career and are great examples of his abilities and both showcase a talent that would become famous for his imagination, imagery, and signature body horror. There is no one quite like Cronenberg to really disturb you and make you feel so trapped by the flesh we live in and how easily it can be manipulated. 

Before Cronenberg became an English major and film student at the University of Toronto, he was an honors science student. Now, this may seem like a minor fact, but it was that interest in science that has informed his films ever since. You will not find ghosts or supernatural elements in the films of Cronenberg. His focus is on creating horrors based on scientific possibilities and the power of the human mind. Going even further, Cronenberg is an atheist and believes that there is no spirituality. So despite the viewer’s ideologies, the visions he creates are entirely based on scientific possibilities and make them that much more terrifying. 

I would say Shivers is a good place to start this party, as it’s Cronenberg’s first feature film and perhaps the least seen. The story revolves around urban professionals living in the new Starliner apartment complex, a place that caters to the young urban professional looking for all the amenities of the city (Montreal), without actually having to live there. You know, gym, doctor’s office, pharmacy, movie theater, etc. Dr. Roger St. Luc discovers his coworker has killed a woman and reports it to the police. Roger then learns that the man killed himself while developing a parasite to take over organ function in the human body.

Meanwhile, the film also follows a young man who becomes a breeding ground for the parasite after having an affair with an infected girl. As it spreads, the tenants of the building begin to act more sexually aggressive. Roger discovers that Hobbes was trying to turn the world into one big orgy, and it becomes a race against time as Roger attempts to stop the parasites’ spread. 

Swing, Baby!

What makes Shivers so damn interesting is why it’s terrifying. Unlike zombie movies where the person becomes a mindless flesh-eater, here there is a piece of the original person left. But their inhibitions have been stripped away until what’s left is little more than animals, sexual beings of a ravenous appetite, stripped of moral constructs or any ideas beyond satisfying the most animal of instincts. It’s fascinating to peek into fear from a very logical mind. From medical experimentation, the next film delves into the dangers of experimental medicine. 

Our second feature Rabid is more famous for Cronenberg’s use of pornstar Marilyn Chambers as his star than the film itself, which is a shame. The film centers on Hart Reed and his girlfriend Rose, played by Chambers, who has a motorcycle accident riding in the country. Hart suffers minor injuries while Rose is seriously injured and burned. They are taken to the Keloid Clinic for Plastic Surgery, where head surgeon Dan Keloid decides to use an experimental treatment on Rose. He uses morphogenetically neutral grafts to her chest and abdomen in the hope that it will differentiate and replace the damaged skin and organs. Rose remains in a coma, while Hart is released. When she does wake, Rose does so screaming, and another patient goes to comfort her. While he does this, Rose pierces his skin and takes blood from him. He has no memory of the incident, and while he is transferred to another hospital for observation, Rose escapes. While Hart begins to search for Rose, she attacks more people, as do those she has fed on.

I don’t know how to tell you this… your arm pit is as horrifying as my eyebrows

Again the loss of oneself in a monstrous transformation is horrifying but so are the doctor’s actions. Although it’s not as stressed as it could have been, Cronenberg is still pointing out the dangers of medical experimentation. Recently the Soska sister’s remade this film, and they certainly made a strong emphasis on this concept with a story twist. But it’s important to remember this is an original concept and only the second feature film by a great director. From the dangers of medical experimenting to the dangers of exploring the human mind, we head into our last film on the list. 

Ummm… potstickers anyone?

The Brood is another highly original concept, but there are times the premise gets a little hokey. The story centers on Frank Carveth. He is dealing with his wife Nola, who is legally embattled with for the custody of their 5-year-old daughter Candice. At the same time, Nora is being treated at the Somafree Institute, where psychotherapist Hal Raglan, played by Oliver Reed, is using an experimental technique called Psychoplasmics. The technique encourages the patience to let go of their mental disturbances to manifest their repressed feelings as physiological manifestations. Frank has no respect for it and is annoyed he has to bring his daughter there to see her mother. After bathing Candice, Frank is incensed to see she has bruises and believes Nora is responsible. While he leaves his daughter with her maternal grandmother Juliana to visit a lawyer, he also informs Raglan he is ending visitation rights. Raglan decides to intensify his therapy sessions, and during a session with Nola, he discovers she beliefs her mother abused her while her father ignored the abuse. Not long afterward, Juliana is killed by what appears to be a child, Candice overhears the incident and discovers the body. Soon more people Nola is angered with are attacked by the strange mutant children while Frank struggles to protect Candice and Raglan tries to find a way to stop what he suspects is happening with Nola. 

Pretty freaking creepy, eh?

The whole “mutant killer children” concept is a little on the hokey side, but there are some great performances and really cool ideas in this film. To start, Oliver Reed is fantastic in every scene he is in. Honestly, it’s hard to pin down your emotions about him onscreen as he transitions from a character you despise, as an arrogant doctor to a man caught up in something beyond his imaginings and desperate to stop it you root for. And Samantha Egger’s Nola has a fantastically creepy final scene that is both disturbing and chilling. The concept of emotional disturbances manifesting physically to the extent they become physical embodiments of your rage strikes me as very original. There have certainly been films where characters have psychic abilities to attack people, but they are literally an angry person who manifests a mutant being that then attacks the source of the person’s rage. I cannot think of another film that uses this same concept, but I would sure like to know if others exist. 

Finally, you will have to do a bit of navigating to see all these movies, as I am sorry to say they are not all on one service. Shivers is available on Apple TV, Vudu, and YouTube for purchase or rent. Rabid is for rent on Vudu or Amazon and free on prime and free also on Kanopy. The Brood is only available with a subscription through HBO max or Criterion or free on Kanopy. I think they make for a great triple feature because they showcase the start of Cronenberg’s career and make for great pairing because they have about the same impact. Unlike some of his more famous films with a much more significant impact emotionally and ranking a lot higher on the weird scale, these are fine films and pretty easy to watch in one shot. 

A Collection of Desires: 7 Tales of Modern Horror

Originally published in the Spring of 2018 as an Amazon exclusive, Horror Vision founder and co-host Shawn C. Baker’s break-out collection of short stories makes a new mark as the first Literary work published under the Horror Vision Press imprint. 7 Tales to chill your blood:

Scare Me: At a Hollywood movie premiere, Apple and Lucas discover a new app marketed toward enhancing the experience of upcoming horror film Scare Me. The app claims it can blur the lines of reality that separate the viewer from the film. Sounds cutting edge and cool, but can it really be a good idea to inhabit a horror flick’s reality? Probably not.

The Apartment: Upon returning to his home town, Devlin’s former bandmate Cole drops a bomb: the song they wrote and performed as an invocation to the Hebrew Angel of Terror? Not only did it work, but they didn’t complete their banishing ritual.

In His Arms, She Felt Loved: Vicki and Addison’s marriage has devolved to a violent charade, but when she kills him in self-defense, Vicki finds her problems are only beginning.

The Midnight Tree: A barback on Chicago’s southside searches for an elusive nightclub that has a long, infamous history.

Pentagram Girls:¬†After his divorce, Gary discovers dating apps. Be careful Gary, you never know who you’ll meet online.

1422 Euclid: Sex addiction is a terrible thing. What’s worse are the creatures that feed on the addict’s pain.

A Collection of Desires: The couple that kills together stays together, right? Well, when Mark and April decide to murder her landlord, things go kind of awry…