Cineray Under Siege!

It’s time to get ready for a fight, horror fiends! In 1976, director John Carpenter released Assualt on Precinct 13 and almost single-handedly created the modern siege film. The story of a policeman with a couple of other officers, secretaries, three felons, and a hysterical man trying to keep at bay gang members who are trying to break into a closing police station in an abandoned section of Los Angeles to kill them all was groundbreaking. The gang members were a nameless, faceless threat, while the people keeping them out were charismatic and likable. The film also highlighted a characteristic that would be synonymous with the siege drama: urban blight. These films and stories would literally not be possible if the locations under siege – once functional structures occupying the heart of booming, populated areas – had not been left behind, abandoned by urban growth. Since the film was released, the genre has become a favorite subgenre within Horror (even Carpenter himself returned to it several times) so today, we are going to dive into a siege double feature with John Carpenter’s Ghosts of Mars and Joe Begos’ VFW

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Deep Sea Cineray

Let’s take a deep dive today, fiends! Today’s double feature is all about monsters from deep down in the ocean. In my opinion, today’s double feature entries broke the ground for a film like last year’s Underwater to be made. That’s right, deep-sea diabolists, today’s double feature is Deep Star Six and Leviathan

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Cineray Hits the Strip Club

Get ready for beauty with bite fiends! Strip clubs are very lascivious places where men throw their money down for sexy ladies to dance and reveal more of their bodies while alcohol is usually drunk. But what if the ladies who dance in these clubs were after more than the patrons’ wallets? What if they wanted a little more? Like, say the blood pumping through their veins, for instance. Today’s double feature is two tales of strip clubs filled with the most deadly dancers, vampires and riff-raff. The double-feature recommendation is Vamp and From Dusk Till Dawn. 

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Cineray Wants Revenge!

It’s time for payback, fiends! If you are any kind of horror fan, you know that there is a revenge sub-genre. It has existed almost as long as horror movies have, with Tod Browning’s Freaks being one of the earliest examples I can think of. What separates horror revenge films from revenge thrillers is the level of violence and gore that bridges typically into the territory of exploitation. Other prime examples of the genre are The Last House on the Left and The Day of the Woman, aka I Spit on Your Grave. These films are known for their extreme levels of violence and gore. So with revenge in mind, today’s double feature is Revenge and Mandy

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Kong Vs Godzilla

This episode, Anthony gives his review of Adam Wingard’s King Kong vs. Godzilla, and as a diehard fan of the giant lizard, we trust his opinion. Also, Shawn gives Wrong Turn 2021 its second chance on the show, Tori talks South-Western Giallo White of the Eye a holler before joining Shawn in salivating over Waxwork Records‘ new Lords of Salem vinyl release. Plus, Larry Fessenden’s graphic novel and LOTS more!

Cineray Gets Furry

Let’s get hairy, fiends! Today’s Cineray recommended movies are two of my favorite werewolf movies ever! 

Ever since I was a kid, werewolves have been among my favorite monsters. Something about the lore and the look and the general terror associated with the creatures fascinates me. The concept of being a noble, good-intentioned person cursed to become a monstrous beast driven to attack people by the changing moon is mesmerizing. It’s not Jekyll who keeps taking his potion or an evil vampire driven by bloodlust. No, this is a person trying to control a beast within and trying to cure themselves of it. So today’s double feature is Werewolf of London and Dog Soldiers

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What We’re Watching

Ray discusses Tobe Hooper’s 80s Space-Vampire movie Lifeforce as a homage to Hammer Horror by way of Twins of Evil. Tori has an awesome theory that Pyscho Goreman exists in the same world as another film we love, and Shawn sings the praises of Alex de la Iglesia’s recently finished HBO opus 30 Coins! Plus, The Love Witch, the new Mortal Combat trailer, and all the stuff in 2021 we’re waiting for!

The Cineray of Your Dreams… or Nightmares!

Greetings, horror fiends. Think about it: we spend our days working or doing whatever we have to, and every night we sleep to restore ourselves. But sometimes sleep is not restful at all; sometimes it’s worse than being awake. Sleep can be troubled, our dreams plagued with the anxieties of our daily lives, nightmares filled with demons of the things we fear. Today’s double feature focuses on nightmares and the monsters that call them home. No glove-wearing, crispy-skinned killers here kids, today’s double feature is Dreamscape and Dream Demon

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Spell, Kill List, 2010’s Blood Junkie & 1988’s Dream Demon!

We talk about the lost gem of 2020 – Mark Tonderai’s Spell! This one’s gnarly folks, and we’ll tell you why it would have been on our best of 2020 list had we actually seen it in 2020 (shout out to Alex and Christina from the Beyond the Void podcast for putting this on our radar).

Also, Tori talks Drew Rosas’ Blood Junkie, Ray digs into Harley Cokliss’s goopy Dream Demon (recently released through Arrow), and Anthony and Shawn sing the praises of Ben Wheatley’s Kill List! Plus – a lot more HORROR!!!

Psycho Goreman Spoiler-Free Review

Steven Kostanski’s new film Psycho Goreman hit VOD on Friday and Anthony and Shawn have seen it and wish to sing its praises! Here’s their quick, spoiler-free review, which also walks viewers through a bit of Kostanski’s history as a part of the Astron-6, his other films, and where you can watch this gore-tastic new flick!

Cineray Explores Strange Connections in this literary Double-Feature

Hey there fiends, today’s Cineray recommendations are going to seem bizarre together. Both were released in the last year, and they are going to seem completely unrelated at first. And yet, therein lies the power of this double feature. You see, both films have surprise twists at their conclusions that tie them together. That’s right, today’s recommendations are Underwater and Castle Freak

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Bad Santa vs. Bad Ass Kids Cineray

Happy Holidays, fiends! If you are like me, somewhere in an old family photo album or special holiday frame is a picture of a child version of you sitting on Santa’s lap while crying your eyes out. As we grow up, our parents tell us that Santa brings us presents and, therefore, we should not be afraid of him. But maybe that childhood instinct is correct. Perhaps, trusting a fat old man with beard dresses In a red suit who loves kids is a lot sketchier than we give the story credit. Today’s Cineray holiday recommendations are a couple of films about some very dangerous Santas and the badass kids who battle against them in Dial Code Santa Claus and Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale

Dial Code Santa Claus – AKA Deadly Games –  is like a demented and scarier Home Alone with a kid that has watched all the best 80’s action movies. The story takes place on Christmas Eve in the home of Thomas. Thomas is a brilliant boy with a grand imagination and a wealthy mother that indulges him. He dresses for his day like a mini Rambo and spends his day capturing his dog in trap doors. Thomas has installed a camera system throughout his entire house and can see everything from a remote on his wrist. 

Impressed? 

The camera system is the least of his security measures. 

Thomas also spends his days with Papy, his grandfather, and works to repair his mother’s old car while Julie, his mother, manages a department store. Meanwhile, a man spots the store is hiring for a Santa and takes the job. When a girl accuses Santa of being fake, the jolly bastard slaps her. Julie sees this happen and fires him immediately. He steals her address, though and after killing a delivery driver and stealing his van, goes to her home. When he breaks in, Thomas mistakes this criminal for the actual Santa until a brutal event shows him the truth. Thomas has to mount a defensive to save himself and his grandfather from the psycho Santa. 

What makes this movie great is the motifs and sequences it borrows from 80s action movies we know and love. It’s not a movie with a lot of kills, but it’s smart with the kills it does have and fills in the gaps with action. I would even hazard that one kill can be downright polarizing for viewers and may anger them to consider stopping the film right there. But I think it’s a bold move to establish the unforgivable evil as the crazy man simply known as Par Noel and put him in a Santa suit. It creates an eerie undertone beneath those 80’s action motifs.

Take the opening scene of Thomas suiting up with boots, toy knives, and camouflage, all laced up and strapped on to a knock-off hard rock soundtrack. These shots would usually be close-ups on the tight, rippling muscles of a Stallone or Schwarzenegger, but here they’re of a kid whose only resemblance to those 80s action stars is a spectacular mullet. And considering the odds and events Thomas has to deal with, he’s a total badass. It’s not a perfect film by far; there’s an opening that is heavy with exposition, and some of the callbacks overstay their welcome. But it’s a French take on over-the-top American Cinema, so it kind of makes sense.  

Next, we move from a psychotic Santa to a demonic one.

Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale is an extremely original concept that is really brought to life by a fantastic cast. The story starts with a survey crew on a mountain. They’re using a drill to take soil samples and find what they’re looking for when the foreman presents Riley, the man finding the operation, with soil that contains sawdust. Riley is excited as he explains the dust’s presence as evidence of something trapped in ice. Riley tells his crew they are close to finding what they set out to find, none other than Santa Claus, or at the very least the being that the Santa myth is based on, frozen in this ice. 

Nearby, local boys Jusso and Pietari are sneaking around the site, listening to all of this. They hurry home, and Pietari begins to read up on this creature buried in the mountain. He discovers old folklore about a horned man with goat’s feet who once ran free, whipping and sometimes eating children who misbehave. The next day during the town’s annual reindeer hunt, Pietari’s father Rauno and some other men discover the corpses of hundreds of reindeer, all gnawed and eaten. They believe wolves have been driven wild by the mountain’s excavation, but when the disappearance of some local children follows this, it’s Jusso and Pietari who know the truth. The kids know better than the adults because adults are conditioned to disregard folklore, while the children are open to the fantastic. 

Rare Exports‘ crisp, sharp cinematography and excellent production and set design make it a joy to watch. Nothing here looks fake, and similar to John Carpenter’s The Thing, this entry into the “monster thawed from the ice” subgenre feels very original. 

Again these are both foreign films with subtitles, one being French and the other Finnish, and they both are great. As is usually the case with a good foreign film, at some point, you forget you are reading as you watch and just start doing it automatically and enjoying the movie. To watch these, you can stream Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale from several places, with options to watch for free with ads or with the cost of a rental or subscription but as usual, it’s on Shudder along with Dial Code Santa Claus so why not watch there. 

New Mutants, Itsy Bitsy & After Midnight!

Anthony and Shawn spend a calm afternoon catching up on recent viewings. Josh Boone’s New Mutants, Micah Gallo’s Itsy Bitsy, Jeremy Gardner’s After Midnight, and Shudder’s Cleansing Hour. Also, our reaction to the news about Dan Trachtenberg’s Predator and Ridley Scott’s next Alien movie! Plus, a helluva lot more!

Cineray Double-Feature! Near Dark and John Carpenter’s Vampires

Hey there horror fiends, for some summertime vampire fun, this week’s double feature is Vampires directed John Carpenter and Near Dark directed by Kathryn Bigelow. The weather is starting to heat up, and it’s the perfect time to watch vampire movies that take place in desert settings. Locations like these present some interesting problems for sun-sensitive creatures and the people or victims who interact with them. 

I would recommend Vampires as the first of these to watch as its fast-moving and pretty action-packed. The film centers on Jack Crow (James Woods) and his Vatican-sponsored group of vampire hunters. Crow’s group of mercenaries are not men of god, but killers who enjoy the hunt, and when they are not exterminating vampires, they are hard-partying. This is something the priest on the team objects to, but Jack allows because of the horrors they experience fighting and killing vampires. After a day of successful vamp killing, the group celebrates with a party and hookers at a hotel.

During their party and with most of the team drunk, a master vampire named Valek (Thomas Ian Griffith) attacks and kills most of the team and the hookers. Only Jack Crow, his second in command Tony Montoya, and prostitute Katrina (Sheryl Lee) survive the attack. Katrina, however, gets bitten. After the attack, Crow is assigned Father Adam Guiteau by the Church. This new, three-man team brings Katrina on their pursuit of Valek, who is searching for a relic that turned him into the first vampire.

Don’t look behind you…

Katrina is a quasi-prisoner, and the bite is slowly changing her into a vampire, which gives her a psychic link to Valek, which Crow exploits to aid in their pursuit of him. Complications arise from Montoya’s empathy and attraction to Katrina that threaten the team. As they get closer to Valek, the danger gets worse, and there is more going on then they may suspect. 

Does that give you wood, padre?

Vampires is not Carpenter’s best film, but it is an enjoyable movie. Woods is perfect as the anti-hero Crow, the kind of guy you are glad to see do his job, but not someone you would ever want to meet. The film moves at a nice brisk pace, and the action is great. The team’s method of harpooning and then dragging vampires into the sunlight using vehicle hoists is impressive, and considering the strength of these vampires proves a great solution for helping them keep their distance from the creatures. The film also has somewhat of a western feel that leads into the second feature nicely. 

Classic poster

Near Dark, directed by Kathryn Bigelow, is an excellent horror movie with western elements that has thankfully only grown in popularity and cult status since its modest release. The film stars Adrain Pasdar, Jenny Wright, Lance Henriksen, Bill Paxton, Janette Goldstein, and Joshua John Miller. Henriksen, Paxton, and Goldstein were all featured in James Cameron’s film Aliens, leading to their casting in this film after Cameron suggested them to Bigelow. 

Near Dark concerns a young man named Caleb (Pasdar) living on his father’s farm in a small town who meets Mae (Wright) one night. Mae is a pretty drifter, and after spending the night together, she bites Caleb just before dawn. She then takes him in the RV the group she travels with calls home. 

Bloody good fun for the whole family!

The new addition to their group causes problems in Mae’s vampire family. Severin ( Paxton) wants to kill Caleb, but Jesse (Henriksen), the group’s leader, decides to give it a week to see if Caleb can hunt and kill. Caleb refuses, however, Mae helps him survive and hide this from the others. Paxton is fantastic and terrifying as the bloodthirsty and murderous Severin. Henriksen is excellent as well. Miller is also great as the child vampire Homer, a decades-old vampire trapped inside a child’s body. There is a fantastic line of dialogue that implies Jesse is an old confederate soldier and that he and Severin are responsible for at least one tragedy in history. The desert setting adds a nice challenge for the group, providing some fantastic cinematic moments. Watch for the bloody bar scene – you’ll know it when you get to it. Near Dark is on the moody and slower-moving side, but its fantastic moments of intensity more than make up for that. 

Severin in all his glory. RIP Bill Paxton

So, why these two together, you may ask. It’s interesting to see how two different directors handle the vampire mythos in similar settings. Carpenter’s approach is a lot more pedestrian and very clear on what the movie is about, from the title through the film to the clearly delineated protagonists and antagonists. Near Dark, on the other handis a lot more moody and subtle; the term vampire is never used in the film, and it’s a lot more ambiguous as to who are the protagonists and antagonists. The only problem with these picks is availability. Vampires is readily available from all the usual streaming rental sites; however, Near Dark is unfortunately not only out of print at the moment, but also not streaming on any services. This one is a used copy find, but honestly, very much worth buying.

Cineray Double-Feature!

Grindhouse time, baby!

Welcome to Cineray, the first article of a new column where I will write movie reviews and suggest cool flicks for you to spend your time watching. I’m a guy who loves cinema, but what’s more, I have a bit of education in the field as well. I have taken a couple of cinema courses, and I’ve studied screenwriting in a classroom environment. I also read film theory for fun, and I watch A LOT of movies. 

I jumped at the chance, and here we go. 

For my very first recommendation, I am going to start with a double feature: Planet Terror, directed by Robert Rodriguez, and Death Proof, directed by Quentin Tarantino, collectively known as Grindhouse.

You can certainly search and watch the two films separately, but I can’t strongly recommend the Grindhouse presentation enough. For one thing, the entire presentation will include the faux theater ratings and the Acuna Boys restaurant ad, but it also contains the great mostly fake trailers made by some famous director. I say ‘mostly’ because the first faux trailer before Planet Terror is Machete, which Rodriguez eventually turned into a film. When that happened, I held so much hope that we would eventually see all those trailers turned into movies by the same directors, but it never happened. 

The flick that brought the gindhouse aesthetic to the masses. Sort of.

What’s great about the whole presentation is how the creators involved tried to recreate the entire Grindhouse experience of the ’70s for an audience in the present day complete with missing reels, and all the pops and scratches that were present in the films of that era. 

The trailers themselves are mini works of art that reference 70’s films in various ways. Machete harkens back to films like Death Race 2000 where the fun is the body count as well as the lone hero films like Billy Jack.

Rodriguez has upped the violence and gore and brought a more current political climate to the tale. The rest of the trailers appear after the presentation of Planet Terror and I will discuss them in the order presented.

Werewolf Women of the SS from Rob Zombie references Nazi exploitation films with a great historical reference twist. The regency is after the fall of Nazi Germany in WWII, there was a German Nazi resistance movement called Werewolves. Knowing his history, Zombie takes that knowledge and smartly twists it into a concept of a Nazi scientist trying to create werewolf soldiers and hey why not throw in fictional supervillain Fu Manchu played by Nick Cage.

Again this is Zombie flexing his knowledge as Fu Manchu was not just a villain of comics and films but a literary creation of the 1920s and would have certainly been a part of movie serials. 

Then there is Don’t directed by Edgar Wright who blends the style of Hammer and haunted house movies like the House on Haunted Hill into a demented little gem with shocks and laughs.

What I have also found so impressive about this one is that it no only references the films but if you have ever watched film trailers of the era it very much has that pattern starting with one jump scare into another until it builds to a mania of them. Finally, there is Thanksgiving directed by Eli Roth that is not only a reference to the Halloween films but even more so to the gorier slashers of the 80s like Blood Rage and the Mutilator. When I saw this film in the theaters I literally heard gasps during this trailer. 

Moving onto the films, Planet Terror is a fun gory quasi-zombie movie with lots of great moments. The scenes involving Dakota and her needles have been known to make several of my friends squirm for example. Its storyline is not so much an homage to a single film or genre as several from the siege films of Carpenter to the zombie movies of Romero with a lot of Rodriguez’s trademark violence and humor. And of course, there is a memorable cameo from Tarantino. The one thing to note about the story of this one is that it moves a lot quicker and has a lot more substance to its characters than most of the grindhouse cinema of the era. The one-story element I feel like is a throwback to those movies is the lack of explanation of El Rey’s infamy and Dakota’s quick turn around after the death of her son. A characteristic of grindhouse is honestly thin backstories and bizarre character evolutions and motivations. 

The second film Death Proof by Tarantino is not so much a horror movie per se and a lot slower but still very enjoyable. Tarantino has stated he wanted to make a slasher film but felt the genre to constraining and so decided to blend another of his favorite genres to create a style closer to his style of filmmaking. This movie is more of an homage to the road/car movies of the ’70s, several of which are said by a character in a conversation. I have often heard the pace of this movie is too slow but when you realize the films he is homaging you understand what he is trying to do. 

Finally going back to the audience’s reactions I experienced is another reason I love this one so much. It was Tarantino and Rodriguez making something they wanted to see and were not as invested in what would work for audiences. It’s probably why it was one of the more unpopular ventures of the two men but that’s also why I champion the movie whenever I can. It is going to be easy to find the movies separately but the film is available for streaming in its entirety on Vudu and iTunes and best of all free on YouTube in HD. Finally, get some popcorn and a soda or your favorite beer and a pizza and seat down and watch it all in one big 193-minute viewing, trust me it’s the best way. 

Quarantine Viewing Guide III: Revenge of the Viewing Guide!

After a small website mishap – thank you Amy for the save – we’re back, with an episode we recorded nearly a month ago! Hear Ray, Anthony, Tori, and Shawn talk about what we’re watching to get through the Quarantine. Topics of discussion include but are not limited to: Emma Tammi’s The Wind, Paul Verhoeven’s Robocop (about due for a re-watch, eh?), CHUD II: Electric Boogaloo, and Laird Barron’s third book in the Isaiah Coleridge series, Worse Angels. Also, Sara Lotz’s haunted survival novel The White Road, and Anthony revisits Jamie Blanks’ 2001 millenial slasher Valentine. Does it hold up? Listening is half the battle!

The Void!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tori, Anthony, Ray, and Shawn gather via Zoom to discuss one of the greatest independent Horror movies of our time – Jeremy Gillespie and Steven Kostanski’s The Void! Part homage to Fulci, Carpenter, and Barker, part practical FX masterpiece, let us tell you why we love this movie! Also discussed, Blood Quantum, Clive Barker’s debut novel The Damnation Game, and a whole lot more!

Quarantine Viewing Guide!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While the smart people in the world remain sheltered-in-place, Chris, Ray, and Shawn hold their first remote meeting to help give you recommendations for what to watch and read while we’re all trying to Flatten the Curve! Plus – a brief remembrance of Stuart Gordon and the films by him we love!

Jon Wright’s Grabbers!

This episode we watch and react to Jon Wright’s delightful 2012 Horror/Comedy Grabbers, an Irish monster movie with a beautiful setting and a drunken cast. Our Classic Corner pick is Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator and we don’t stop there! Locke and Key’s premiere on Netflix, Dale Fabrigar’s D-Railed, Osgood Perkins’ Gretel and Hansel, Shudder’s The Marshes, American Horror Story, David Cronenberg’s debut novel Consumed, and Vault Comics knock-out horror titles The Plot and Black Stars Above. Oh, and there’s quite a bit more where those came from. Su Nioj!

Underwater Spoiler Review & Freaked @ Beyondfest

Yes, Shawn loved Underwater so much that he invited his fellow fiends from The Horror Vision to go out and see it in the theatre. Here’s our SPOILER HEAVY discussion, because there’s a lot to discuss! Also, the fine gents from Beyondfest hosted 1993’s Freaked played at the Egyptian Theatre and Shawn was there! A full account of the flick and all the wonderful fixings that accompanied this historic screening!

Jaron Henrie-McCrea’s The Gateway, plus, our Best of 2019 and the Decade!!!

We’re back with a double-sized mutha-f*&ka of an episode! Tori, Anthony, Ray, and Shawn watch and review Jaron Henrie-McCrea’s WONDERFUL The Gateway (aka Curtain), which is streaming on Prime, Tubi, and Vudu for free and everyone should watch. Then we go into our “What the hell did we watch?” roundtable where topics of conversation include but are not limited to Tori’s review of Neil Marshal’s Hellboy, Anthony’s review of Blumhouse’s Black Christmas, Shawn’s review of Antrum: The Deadliest Film Ever Made, and Ray’s analysis of Cutting Class. Yes, that Cutting Class. After that, we have Tobe Hooper’s 1982 masterpiece Poltergeist as our Classic Corner pick, and then we take turns giving you our favorite Horror Films of 2019, and the decade! That’s right folks – a new decade is upon us!

 

The Frankenstein Episode!

No, we do not talk about Frankenstein in this episode. This is the “Frankenstein” episode because due to faulty batteries and an increasing amount of Octoberfest beer, we had to record this one three times, well into the wee hours of the morning. This one is a ‘slow burn,’ but the conversation meanders into some, frankly, pretty cool places, so strap in for Chris and Tori’s reaction to Lupita Nyong’o and Josh Gad in Little Monsters, Ray’s first encounter with the convoluted masterpiece that is Lamberto Bava’s Demons series, Gaspar Noé’s Climax, AHS: 1984 and Apocalypse, Chillerama, and, oh yeah, how Nubbins from Texas Chainsaw 2 recently ran afoul of TSA security! All that, and a whole lot more.

Beyondfest 2019 Update – Joe Bob Briggs, Tammy & the T-Rex, and Joe Begos!

Pardon the free-form feel of this quick episode, but it’s late and we’ve just arrived home after the sensory overload experience that is Joe Begos’ BLISS! More on that in a moment, though, as Shawn and Ray give you a quick recap of our Beyondfest experiences for the week. We start with a recap of Joe Bob Brigg’s How Rednecks Saved Hollywood – definitely not horror, but when a two-and-a-half-hour lecture about where Rednecks come from and how they eventually came to define Hollywood  is this good AND it’s presented by the premiere Horror Host of our era, you’re damn right we’re talking about it on our podcast! Follow that with a screening of the newly re-gorified cut of Tammy and the T-Rex and, well, that’s the best Monday night we’ve had in quite some time. Then, as mentioned above, shortly before recording this we attended a Double Feature of Joe Begos’ two new films, the psycho-delic vampire freakout Bliss, and the all-star siege horror of VFW and, well, are you starting to see why we love Beyondfest so much?

RIP Rutger Hauer

On this very special episode of The Horror Vision, Chris, Ray, Anthony, and Shawn bid farewell to Genre Icon Ruger Hauer. We talk about our favorites from his filmography and even use the back half of the episode to react to a viewing of 1992’s Split Second, which pits Hauer against… well, something. At the top of the episode, we talk about our personal horror film hatreds, Chris’s love of the new What We Do In the Shadows series, Ray’s voyage into the works of Jodorowsky and Kenneth Anger, Anthony reviews Slaughterhouse Rulez, and Shawn reports on his painstaking attempt to watch all the Friday the 13th films in sequential order for the first time.

Mike Mendez’s The Convent + A Whole Lot More!!!

As has become their custom, Tori, Ray, Anthony, and Shawn gather on a Saturday night to talk about all the horror flicks they’ve watched since the last episode, then round the night out with a viewing of and reaction to Mike Mendez’s 2000 film The Convent. Other topics of discussion include The Nest, Pledge, Border, Sam Was Here, The Wind, and The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Season 1 part 2. Also, Anthony loves the new Mortal Combat game and Shawn is excited as all hell that HULU recently announced optioning author Nathan Ballingrud’s first book of short stories, North American Lake Monsters!

 

 

Jordan Downey’s The Head Hunter!

It’s Saturday night and Anthony, Ray, and Shawn are joined by good friends John* and Tori for a viewing of Jordan Downey’s awesome new film The Head Hunter, an instant low-budget classic that serves as a fantastic example of how a great film doesn’t necessarily need a ton of resources behind it. As usual, we start the show talking about all the great stuff we’ve found over the last few weeks – Anthony’s visit to Grindhouse Video in Tampa, Tori’s love of The Prophecy and Exorcist III, and John & Shawn’s LA excursion to I Like Scary Movies, to name a few. Sit back, close your eyes, and open your mind to… The Horror Vision!

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*Also, check out John, AKA Jonathan Grimm’s unbelievable art HERE.

Saturday Night Horror Party!

It’s Saturday night and we’ve just had a viewing of Cold Hell! Pumped, Ray, Chris, Anthony, and Shawn decide to do an impromptu episode and talk about what they’ve seen recently, what they recommend you watch and why, what they recommend you don’t watch and why, and all kinds of tangential horror goodness in between!